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March 2021

Monday, 29 March 2021 00:00

What Is Charcot Foot?

When the nerves are damaged in the extremities such as the feet, it is known as peripheral neuropathy. This ultimately leads to Charcot foot when the bones in the foot are weakened. These weakened bones can lead to fractures that worsen and cause the joints in the foot to collapse. Charcot foot can cause the foot to become deformed, and it can be disabling and even potentially lead to amputation. Common signs of Charcot foot are a warmness to the touch, redness, swelling, and pain. Because of its association to neuropathy and neuropathy’s association with diabetes, diabetic patients should monitor their feet for this condition. Patients who believe that they may have this condition should consult with a podiatrist as soon as possible. A podiatrist will be able to assess the foot and suggest treatment options.

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot and Ankle. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Ferndale, Milford, and Commerce Twp., MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Neuropathy
Monday, 22 March 2021 00:00

Finding Shoes for Speed Walking

While many specialty shoe stores emphasize their running shoes, you do not actually need to be a seasoned runner, or even a runner at all, to wear running shoes. Those who prefer to walk for exercise, and especially those who like to speed walk, may find that their shoe needs are best met with running shoes. Running shoes are built to be stable and comfortable. You will also want to look for shoes that are flexible and have adequate cushioning. Shoes that match your gait are also suggested. You can have your gait assessed at some shoe stores, or by a podiatrist. For more information about finding the right shoes for all of your physical fitness needs, please consult with a podiatrist. 

For more information about walking shoes versus running shoes, consult with one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot and Ankle. Our doctors can measure your feet to determine what your needs are and help you find an appropriate pair of footwear.

Foot Health: The Differences between Walking & Running Shoes

There are great ways to stay in shape: running and walking are two great exercises to a healthy lifestyle. It is important to know that running shoes and walking shoes are not interchangeable. There is a key difference on how the feet hit the ground when someone is running or walking. This is why one should be aware that a shoe is designed differently for each activity.

You may be asking yourself what the real differences are between walking and running shoes and the answers may shock you.

Differences

Walking doesn’t involve as much stress or impact on the feet as running does. However, this doesn’t mean that you should be any less prepared. When you’re walking, you land on your heels and have your foot roll forward. This rolling motion requires additional support to the feet.

Flexibility – Walking shoes are designed to have soft, flexible soles. This allows the walker to push off easily with each step.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Ferndale, Milford, and Commerce Twp., MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Differences between Walking and Running Shoes
Sunday, 21 March 2021 00:00

Reminder: When Was the Last Time...?

Custom orthotics, or shoe inserts, should be periodically replaced. Orthotics must fit properly to give you the best results. Protect your feet and ankles!

Monday, 15 March 2021 00:00

What Is Hyperkeratosis?

Keratin is a tough, fibrous protein that is found in the skin. When the skin is exposed to excessive pressure, or is inflamed or irritated, the skin responds by producing extra layers of keratin to protect the damaged area. This is known as hyperkeratosis, and often happens to the skin on the soles of the feet and between the toes, creating calluses and corns. Calluses are areas of thickened skin that are typically uniform in their thickness. Corns are small, hard bumps that usually have a hard center with an outer ring of hardened tissue that is slightly softer than the center. Both calluses and corns can cause discomfort. If you have painful calluses, corns, or otherwise thickened, hardened skin on your feet, please consult with a podiatrist.

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact one of our podiatrists of Michigan Foot and Ankle. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Ferndale, and Milford, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Corns: What Are They, and How Do You Get Rid of Them

Every year, one-third of those over 65, and half of those over 80, will experience a fall.  As we age, our mobility becomes compromised, our muscles weaken, we can become unsteady from a multitude of pharmaceuticals, and even compensate for the changes in our bodies by the way that we walk. We can reduce our chances of falling by recognizing and treating foot pain, wearing proper shoes, doing particular exercises, and adjusting our gaits. To ensure you are on proper footing, consider contacting a podiatrist to perform a comprehensive podogeriatric assessment to help you reduce your risks of falling and improve your quality of life.

Preventing falls among the elderly is very important. If you are older and have fallen or fear that you are prone to falling, consult with one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot and Ankle. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality advice and care.

Every 11 seconds, an elderly American is being treated in an emergency room for a fall related injury. Falls are the leading cause of head and hip injuries for those 65 and older. Due to decreases in strength, balance, senses, and lack of awareness, elderly persons are very susceptible to falling. Thankfully, there are a number of things older persons can do to prevent falls.

How to Prevent Falls

Some effective methods that older persons can do to prevent falls include:

  • Enrolling in strength and balance exercise program to increase balance and strength
  • Periodically having your sight and hearing checked
  • Discuss any medications you have with a doctor to see if it increases the risk of falling
  • Clearing the house of falling hazards and installing devices like grab bars and railings
  • Utilizing a walker or cane
  • Wearing shoes that provide good support and cushioning
  • Talking to family members about falling and increasing awareness

Falling can be a traumatic and embarrassing experience for elderly persons; this can make them less willing to leave the house, and less willing to talk to someone about their fears of falling. Doing such things, however, will increase the likelihood of tripping or losing one’s balance. Knowing the causes of falling and how to prevent them is the best way to mitigate the risk of serious injury.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Ferndale, Milford, and Commerce Twp., MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Falls Prevention
Monday, 01 March 2021 00:00

Common Reasons a Bunion Can Develop

A bunion is a bony protrusion that forms at the base or side of the big toe and can gradually develop for genetic reasons. Additionally, wearing shoes that do not fit correctly may also contribute to the formation of a bunion. It appears as a deformity that can cause pain and discomfort. Some patients find mild relief when a protective pad is worn over the bunion, and it may be necessary to wear orthotics. Additionally, it can help to perform specific stretches that can strengthen the toes and surrounding muscles. If you notice a bunion is developing, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can offer treatment options, such as surgery for permanent removal.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact one of our podiatrists of Michigan Foot and Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Ferndale, and Milford, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions
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