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June 2022

Runners depend strongly on the shoes they wear to help them run efficiently, effectively, and safely. But it’s not enough to simply go out and buy a pair of running shoes, because they may not work well with your specific foot type. Three categories of running shoes are motion control shoes, stability shoes, and neutral or cushioned shoes. If you have no discernible foot problems, comfort is key. The best choice for normal feet is likely to be a stability shoe, which will provide both adequate motion control and cushioning. High arched feet have a narrow band between the forefoot and heel, reducing natural shock absorption with each step. Therefore, experts suggest wearing cushioned running shoes. For the runner who has flat feet, a  high-stability or motion-control shoe is believed to be most beneficial. Harder and stiffer midsoles lessen the chance of the foot rolling inward. If you are unsure about which running shoe is best for your foot type, please consult a podiatrist who can examine your feet and offer guidance.


 

If you are a runner, wearing the right running shoe is essential. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot and Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Choosing the Right Running Shoe for Your Foot Type

To increase performance and avoid the risk of injury, it is important to choose the right running shoe based on your foot type. The general design of running shoes revolves around pronation, which is how the ankle rolls from outside to inside when the foot strikes the ground.

  • Neutral runners are able to choose from a wide variety of shoes, including minimalist shoes or even going barefoot.
  • Runners who overpronate, or experience an over-abundance of ankle rolling, should choose shoes that provide extra motion control and stability.
  • Runners who underpronate, or supinate, have feet that have high arches and lack flexibility, preventing shock absorption. They require shoes with more flexibility and cushion.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Ferndale, Milford, and Commerce Twp., MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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If you cycle and have pain near the bottom of the calf or back of the ankle, it could be Achilles pain. The Achilles tendons are at the back of the ankle and connect the calf muscle to the heel. If this area is sore during or after riding your bike, you likely have Achilles tendonitis or tendinosis. If your Achilles tendon gets inflamed or you sustain micro tears or compromised blood flow to the area, it could halt your cycling. Paying attention to the proper bike fit, saddle height, and pedal/cleat set-up for your frame and feet, as well as doing stretching and strengthening exercises before and after riding, could prevent these injuries. Similarly, consider that you may need more support inside your shoes to prevent over pronation of the knees and leg stress while pedaling. If issues arise and you feel pain in your ankles or feet from cycling, seek out a podiatrist for the proper diagnosis and treatment of your condition.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists of Michigan Foot and Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Ferndale, Milford, and Commerce Twp., MI . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Wednesday, 15 June 2022 00:00

Do Your Child's Feet Hurt?

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.

Among the many components that make up the ankle joint are three bones: the tibia, the fibula, and the talus. There is also cartilage that cushions these bones, and a series of ligaments and tendons that support and bind the ankle. Ankle pain can be caused by a variety of conditions, with an ankle sprain topping the list. This occurs when one or more of the ligaments in the ankle gets stretched beyond its normal limits, or even tears. Ankle strains are similar, but affect the muscles or tendons in the ankle. Fractures in one or more ankle bone(s) can also cause ankle pain, as can osteoarthritis, tarsal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis, bursitis, or Achilles tendon injuries. These are just a few of the conditions that may cause pain in the ankles. If you are experiencing pain, soreness, tenderness, instability, stiffness, immobility, swelling, warmth, or have any other discomfort in your ankle, it is a good idea to make an appointment with a podiatrist for an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment.


 

Ankle pain can be caused by a number of problems and may be potentially serious. If you have ankle pain, consult with one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot and Ankle. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Ankle pain is any condition that causes pain in the ankle. Due to the fact that the ankle consists of tendons, muscles, bones, and ligaments, ankle pain can come from a number of different conditions.

Causes

The most common causes of ankle pain include:

  • Types of arthritis (rheumatoid, osteoarthritis, and gout)
  • Ankle sprains
  • Broken ankles
  • Achilles tendinitis
  • Achilles tendon rupture
  • Stress fractures
  • Bursitis
  • Tarsal tunnel syndrome
  • Plantar fasciitis

Symptoms

Symptoms of ankle injury vary based upon the condition. Pain may include general pain and discomfort, swelling, aching, redness, bruising, burning or stabbing sensations, and/or loss of sensation.

Diagnosis

Due to the wide variety of potential causes of ankle pain, podiatrists will utilize a number of different methods to properly diagnose ankle pain. This can include asking for personal and family medical histories and of any recent injuries. Further diagnosis may include sensation tests, a physical examination, and potentially x-rays or other imaging tests.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are rest, ice packs, keeping pressure off the foot, orthotics and braces, medication for inflammation and pain, and surgery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Ferndale, Milford, and Commerce Twp., MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Tuesday, 07 June 2022 00:00

What is Diabetic Neuropathy?

Many people who have had diabetes for a long time may also have a condition known as diabetic neuropathy. The most common form is peripheral neuropathy, which in diabetics usually affects the feet. Symptoms include numbness, reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes, and tingling or burning sensations. Sharp pains or cramps may also occur. These can further evolve into foot ulcers (wounds that do not heal properly) and infections from cracks or sores in the skin. If ignored or left untreated, gangrene may develop which could lead to surgery or amputation. The main causes of peripheral neuropathy are high levels of sugar and triglycerides in the blood which can damage the nerves and blood vessels in the feet. Since the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy develop over time, it is easy to overlook this condition. Daily foot care is imperative to maintain healthy feet. Another important way to prevent or handle diabetic neuropathy is to schedule regular visits to a podiatrist who can monitor the condition of your feet and treat them accordingly.


 

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot and Ankle. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Ferndale, Milford, and Commerce Twp., MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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